Variation in the Craft Beer Scene

With the explosion of craft beers in the United States, and the most popular beer in this country being light beers, why haven't we seen more craft light beers? I mean, I've enjoyed an albino stout, a cherry wood smoked porter, even a pineapple IPA.

But not a flavorful light beer, it just seems odd to me.

How about you?

Craft beers aren't typically described as "light" but styles that would fit that category are kolsch, helles, pilsner, wheat, hefe, and there are plenty more.

I think the real problem is that it's harder to make a good beer that isn't high ABV because you can't just throw more ingredients in to cover up any mistakes. Look at how many breweries are putting out 5% ABV "session beers". They use fermentables that don't add any body to the beer – namely rice and corn syrup. If they made an all malt beer at 4% or so, it would be significantly better. Michelob even makes a beer like this.

Look at how pilsners are less common.

Also people are less likely to try to get you to justify your prices if you're making high-octane beer. So not only is it more challenging to make a lower ABV beer, you probably can't even charge as much for it.

Look at how people have frequently been reacting to session beers when they're priced the same as other beers from the same brewery. I mean let's be real, a lot of us do both legitimately enjoy good beer and want to get a bit drunk in the process. This makes light beers, session beers, etc, an inherently hard sell.